Interracial dating cultural differences


20-Oct-2019 19:23

In 2013, a record-high 12% of newlyweds married someone of a different race, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of census data.

(This share does not take into account the “interethnic” marriages between Hispanics and non-Hispanics, which we covered in an earlier report on intermarriage.) Looking beyond newlyweds, 6.3% of all marriages were between spouses of different races in 2013, up from less than 1% in 1970.

Even the other day my mom said to me, you couldn’t have found someone better to join our family.

Three months after we started dating, my parents took us along with four of my friends out for dinner at an Indian restaurant.

He and my dad really hit it off and talked the whole time.

My dad always told me that the integrity and character of a person mattered most to him. She told me back in my school years that she was hoping I’d find an excellent Telugu, Brahmin, Hindu, boy. Even though she made comments about cultural compatibility at first, she grew to understand that it’s better to be with someone who respects and loves my culture than someone who looks like they fit in from the outside.The trend toward more interracial marriages is undoubtedly related, at least in part, to changing social norms.Our previous surveys have documented growing acceptance among the public.For Asians, the gender pattern goes in the opposite direction: Asian women are much more likely than Asian men to marry someone of a different race.

Among newlyweds in 2013, 37% of Asian women married someone who was not Asian, while 16% of Asian men married outside of their race.

It felt like an eternity before people started chatting again.